Reader's Responses to Information Overload

“Information is just bits of data. Knowledge is putting them together. Wisdom is transcending them.” (Ram Dass)

Reader's Responses to Information OverloadI know, I know.  I told everyone that I wouldn’t post the newsletter this week but I just couldn’t stop myself!  As you know, last week I talked about information overload and, well, I just have more information to share.  Smile.
I encouraged readers to share what they used to cope with information overload and I couldn’t resist sharing them with you.  They were great:
Mine were:
1. Meditating daily
2. Limiting my input of news from the media
3. Limiting my input from Facebook and other social media
4. Spending time with my friends and family in conversation not related to the current news
5.Increasing my fun quotient- finding ways to have more fun—dancing, listening to music, reading, laughing, watching fun movies, etc.
Readers comments (with permission) were:
Thoughts from Nina Martino:
“I believe that concentration precedes meditation. When doing even simple chores, activities concentrating on one process-undertaking-at a time helps you center in, eliminate a ‘monkey mind’, and achieve better results. Multitasking is a step backwards in my opinion.”
Jerry Glawe said:
“I like to minimize drama. I view little violence. No loud music.”
Jeanie Seward Magee commented on my list and added her own:
“1. Meditating daily
Making everything I do a meditation
2. Limiting my input of news from the media
NTTT – No Trump Talk Today
I love this from a dear friend. Let’s call it by its true name: ” The Republican Administration.” We’re giving entirely too much power to one man. NO ONE PERSON ever does anything without the support of others, many others (actually Buddhist teachings say “ALL others.”) We are interdependent.
3. Limiting my input from Facebook and other social media.
Mindful Mondays NO electronics for Mondays.
4. Spending time with my friends and family in conversation not related to the current news. Family first, then Friends.
5. Increasing my fun quotient- finding ways to have more fun—dancing, listening to music, reading, laughing, watching fun movies, etc.
Yes, yes, yes to all of those
Plus Yoga, DanceEmotion, Golf, Art Classes, Art Groups, Cooking, Dog Walking”
Bassia Barchai added:
“Strict adherence to our Yoga practice—and our early morning Pilates classes——LOVE the routine-LOVE the practice!”
Sangita Moscow commented:
“Somehow I feel that it is important for survival to know what is going on and yet too much news has a depressing effect. I don’t watch TV news because it wastes more time conveying less info. I subscribe to RSN, a computer news service that takes what they consider to be the most important issues from many different sources. There is a title of the post followed by 2-3 sentences giving a general paraphrase of the subject, and the option to open a full article with more detail. I also like to hear the news on the radio because I can be doing something else, thus can vary my attention as desired.”
Jane Berman mentioned:
“Once again you’ve articulated feelings I was only vaguely aware of in myself until recently. What I’d add to # 2 and # 3 is no input after an hour before bedtime. Nothing worse than getting all stressed at the point you’re about to put your head on your pillow!”
Liz Ghatala states:
“One thing I have added to your excellent list. During meditation I do the Tonglen practice for those people in the news who are suffering and we are all suffering regardless of which “side” we are on. This way I feel I am contributing something positive to our collective consciousness field.”
David Bossman mentioned:
“Understand your suggestions about limiting information from news media. Unfortunately in the present political environment, it is extremely difficult. I do believe that people need to speak out.”
These are great ideas. Thought you might like to hear them. Maybe it’s time I did a blog so that readers can respond and hear what others are saying. What do you think?
I’d love to hear from you at docbeverly@aol.com about your thoughts. I truly would.
Beverly

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